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Day at the Beach


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talk to Ralph Hoehn at:
Fax:
+1-425-962-2987
Voice Mail:
+1-802-649-2555
Please tell us your name, your phone number and a good time for us to call you back after 7:30 pm EST or on weekends.
(We do check messages constantly!)

 

 

 

Itís the middle of August, but the weather feels like the end of September. Hereís a story of a

"Day at the Beach"

 

"Seal start" with paddle handy under deck rigging. Time the rhythm of the waves and the receding water, drag the boat down the beach as far as you dare, hop in, seal spray skirt and hope that youíve been faster than the next incoming wave.

 

The first "seal start" worked perfectly. I slopped through the first couple of waves carefully, testing the way the E68 would handle: Due to its strong flare the hull stiffens beautifully the further it is immersed and always resurfaces on a solidly even keel.

The E68 just leaps over the first wave.

 

 

 

A bit of momentum is necessary for the second one.

 

 

 

 

 

The sharp bow shape of the E68 allows it to punch through the wave. By the time the water reaches the cockpit, the hull is already popping to the surface fully stable on an even keel.

 

 

 

This is a very solid position from which to edge into the wave aggressively on a high brace Ö

 

 

 

 

 

... so that the breaking water can run out from under the boat.

 

Encouraged by the secure feeling, I started edging and bracing into the breaking water with increasing aggressiveness. I punched into a breaking wave and immediately began to lean into it. As I came out of the water, I reached far out to starboard and inserted my trusty old two-piece wooden paddle for an extended strong high brace. The next second I found myself inverted in the frothing water, holding two paddle halves.

Rather than attempting to roll up with one of them, running the risk of getting ground into the rapidly shoaling, shell-strewn beach, I took the easy option and punched out.
(My photographer was obviously of the opinion that a boat drifting upside down was not an object worthy of his art.)
By the time I came up the boat had rolled, filled up partially and was headed for the hard. It slammed into the sand a few times before I could get to it. Nonetheless, after refloating it and emptying the water out, there was no sign of any damage. So I set up for a further launch with a different paddle. This led to the next abuse test ...

Respite.

The increasing surf and rising tide thwarted further "seal start" attempts.
Greg, my hefty brother-in-law, took pity and remedied the situation his way: He picked up the boat, turned around, tucked the bow under his arm and dragged me through the sand into the water. I was too stunned to protest against this excessively rough treatment of my baby! The lack of any resulting damage to frame or skin certainly is a testimony to the resilience of the boat however.

Boiling ocean.

 

Airborne!

 

Share the waves Ö

... even with people who wear bicycle helmets to paddle.

 

 

 

 

More on bracing and broaching: a beginners guide.

 

But there was also family fun and games in store for us in the sheltered back bay experiencing

The Softer Side of Pouch

 

 

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